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Educating for Diversity

Spring 2020

  • How do histories of segregation, disenfranchisement, and displacement impact today’s educational, institutional, and schooling commitments to serve diverse populations?
  • How do the interests and needs of different marginalized groups such as Indigenous Peoples and African Americans intersect? 
  • How have the social and schooling engagements by society and institutions of these two groups overlapped and converged? 
  • How have communities of the past and present pursued equal educational access and opportunities for advancement?
  • What might we learn from history to make today’s universities, such as ASU, better at educating students to create a ore inclusive society?
  • How can today’s students put that history to use to create a more truly inclusive society beyond the university?

The ASU charter emphasizes the need for recognizing the relationship between institutional excellence and its commitment to inclusion, access, and equity. This Lab will use the ASU charter as a foundation for addressing challenges within the politics of education, as revealed by histories of education for Native American and African American communities. This investigation will be hands-on, as we arrange site visits to schools that were on the front lines of American battles over education for Indigenous Peoples and Africa Americans.

View more information about this course (link coming soon!).

Image by Steve Harvey | Unsplash

Energy and Social Justice

Spring 2020

  • What does social justice have to do with energy production?
  • Why does transitioning to renewable energy impact communities differently?
  • How do the narratives that are told (and those that are muted or excluded) shape the social impacts of energy transitions?
  • What are the economic, technological, ethical, and political factors driving that difference?
  • Who needs to be included in conversations about transitional energy systems? Are they?

This Humanities Lab course invites students to participate in the discovery and dissemination of ideas for socially and ecologically just energy transitions. Leveraging ASU’s place in the Southwest and its connections to local utilities, the Navajo Nation, the Hopi Nation and the city of Page, students and faculty will focus on the closure of the Navajo Generating station as a case study that allows us to ask more general questions about justice in an era of energy transitions. Engaging and working collaboratively with those communities facing the lived reality of an energy transition, student-faculty teams will explore and develop answers to critical questions. To foster greater awareness and understanding around the issues, we will work with these communities to identify, shape, and communicate the narratives that can inform future efforts in the energy transition/transformation space. Potential mechanisms for communicating such narratives include podcasts, documentary videos and other digital storytelling platforms, as well as social media engagements and art installations.

View more information about this course (link coming soon!)

 

Food, Bodies & the Senses

Spring 2020

TBA

View more information about this course (link coming soon!).

Image by Rainier Ridao | Unsplash


Life without Earth

Spring 2020

In this Lab, students will explore how life and Earth are interconnected and will imagine the possibilities for life absent Earth. Together, students and faculty, along with occasional guests, will explore the literary, philosophical, scientific, social, and cultural dimensions of the entanglement between life and Earth. What kinds of Earthly reliances and restrictions do we take for granted? How might Earthly life expand beyond the Earth What notions of life do we assume because of our shared planetary heritage?

View more information about this course (link coming soon!).

 

Sound and Well-Being

Spring 2020

  • What is “well-being”?
  • What effects well-being?
  • How does sound effect the body? Can some forms of sound be used to heal the body and calm the mind?
  • What is “noise pollution”? How does noise impact the body differently than other sounds? How can healing forms of sound counter the harmful impact of noise?
  • How can healing forms of sound be incorporated into a mindfulness practice or resilience routine? 
  • How can sounds be a useful research method?

View more information about this course (link coming soon!).


Upcoming

 

Race, Culture, and Genetics 
Professors Melissa Wilson-Sayers and Ayanna Thompson
Spring 2021